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AmateurHour  
#1 Posted : Wednesday, March 9, 2016 9:13:07 AM(UTC)


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For nonresident trout enthusiasts like me, Minnesota trout stamps can be confusing. We may be looking at spending the $10, but http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/licenses/license_detail.html?id=24 says that they're only necessary for fishing designated trout streams, trout lakes and Lake Superior and when in possession of trout or salmon.

If you're looking for a list of MN water that contains trout, there's one at http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/fishing/trout_lakes/list.html.

If you're looking for the ones specifically classified as "trout streams, trout lakes and Lake Superior," there's a list at https://www.revisor.mn.gov/rules/?id=6264.0050. The lake classified as Lake Superior is presumably listed elsewhere.

My read is that if you're just going catch and release, a stamp is only needed for designated water. Taking one back to cook up, however, requires the stamp on any water.

Minnesotans or trout experts, please jump in if any corrections are needed.

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Ben Strege  
#2 Posted : Wednesday, March 9, 2016 9:30:25 AM(UTC)


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From the Minnesota Fishing Regulations: "Except as noted, anglers need a Minnesota trout and salmon stamp validation and a fishing or sports license when fishing in designated trout streams, designated trout lakes, Lake Superior, or when possessing trout on waters that are not designated trout water. All trout and salmon in possession require a trout and salmon validation, unless received as a gift. Trout and salmon stamps are not required for children younger than 18 years old, adults who are 65 and older, people fishing with a 24­-hour or 72-­hour license or people who are exempt from fishing license requirements or who receive a fishing license at no charge."

So your analysis seems correct - need a trout stamp if you either have trout or are fishing on designated trout waters. I found it interesting that you don't need to buy a separate trout stamp if you purchase the 24 or 72-hour licenses. I'm not sure if the "fishing license at no charge" means lifetime license renewals or not.

What I've always assumed was that trout stamps were not required for lake trout, only stream trout. However, I could not find that explicitly stated anywhere. Can someone verify this?

AmateurHour  
#3 Posted : Wednesday, March 9, 2016 12:39:25 PM(UTC)


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There is a magnificent fight about trout stamps on the BWCA.com boards. I can't find anywhere in the regs that lakers are excepted, but Tuscarora Outfitters sure recommends it.

Ben Strege  
#4 Posted : Wednesday, March 9, 2016 1:32:39 PM(UTC)


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I looked in the Minnesota Statutes, and it is pretty much the same language as in the fishing regs. It doesn't differentiate between lake trout and stream trout. I guess to be safe, pay the $10 if you are going to be on lakes with any type of trout. I will from now on, though I've never broken the rules since I've never fished on a designated lake/stream or caught a trout period.

matt13  
#5 Posted : Friday, January 6, 2017 12:29:51 PM(UTC)


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Originally Posted by: AmateurHour Go to Quoted Post

For nonresident trout enthusiasts like me, Minnesota trout stamps can be confusing. We may be looking at spending the $10, but http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/licenses/license_detail.html?id=24 says that they're only necessary for fishing designated trout streams, trout lakes and Lake Superior and when in possession of trout or salmon..

To me the details are clear from the DNR "they're only necessary for fishing designated trout streams, trout lakes and Lake Superior and when in possession of trout or salmon". The last and is the important part of this sentence. I'm about 99% sure that you can fish on a lake or stream that contains trout without a trout stamp as long as you don't have a trout on the end of your stringer..

Now with this being said, if it's the middle of July and you are on Kekekabic lake fishing at 100 ft of depth and a DNR official paddles up and notices your fishing style, they might still give you a ticket as you are targetting catching Lake Trout as your intended species of fish. However, if it is late May and you are casting for Walleyes on Knife Lake and happen to catch a Laker, and practice catch and release, I can't imagine there would be a penalty for such a behavior (I'd certainly take that one to court based on the wording of the regulation). In Wisconsin, it's no different fishing for Lake Sturgeon on Lake Winnebago. You can only fish them in Winter with a permit, but if you happen to snag one in the Summer and practice catch and release... you are fine.

Either way to me a fresh Lake Trout meal is just too tasty to pass up so I've always bought the trout stamp when heading up the BW as it's only an additional 10 bucks. 

Ben Strege  
#6 Posted : Friday, January 6, 2017 2:25:51 PM(UTC)


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Originally Posted by: matt13 Go to Quoted Post
To me the details are clear from the DNR "they're only necessary for fishing designated trout streams, trout lakes and Lake Superior and when in possession of trout or salmon". The last and is the important part of this sentence. I'm about 99% sure that you can fish on a lake or stream that contains trout without a trout stamp as long as you don't have a trout on the end of your stringer..

I went back and looked at the statute to see if I could find any and or or. This is what it says:

A person over age 18 and under age 65 required to possess an angling license must have a trout-and-salmon stamp validation to:

(1) take fish by angling in:

(i) a stream designated by the commissioner as a trout stream;

(ii) a lake designated by the commissioner as a trout lake; or

(iii) Lake Superior; or

(2) possess trout or salmon taken in the state by angling.

 

Notice that the first one says "take fish by angling" - any fish. So to fish in a designated trout stream or lake or Lake Superior, you must have a stamp. Then it says or, not and, possess trout or salmon taken in the state by angling. My interpretation is that you need a trout stamp to fish in designated waters or keep a trout taken in any other waters (including lake trout).

In any case, I'm getting a stamp this year.

TuscaroraBorealis  
#7 Posted : Saturday, January 7, 2017 6:31:44 PM(UTC)


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Originally Posted by: matt13 Go to Quoted Post

Originally Posted by: AmateurHour Go to Quoted Post

For nonresident trout enthusiasts like me, Minnesota trout stamps can be confusing. We may be looking at spending the $10, but http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/licenses/license_detail.html?id=24 says that they're only necessary for fishing designated trout streams, trout lakes and Lake Superior and when in possession of trout or salmon..

To me the details are clear from the DNR "they're only necessary for fishing designated trout streams, trout lakes and Lake Superior and when in possession of trout or salmon". The last and is the important part of this sentence. I'm about 99% sure that you can fish on a lake or stream that contains trout without a trout stamp as long as you don't have a trout on the end of your stringer..

Now with this being said, if it's the middle of July and you are on Kekekabic lake fishing at 100 ft of depth and a DNR official paddles up and notices your fishing style, they might still give you a ticket as you are targetting catching Lake Trout as your intended species of fish. However, if it is late May and you are casting for Walleyes on Knife Lake and happen to catch a Laker, and practice catch and release, I can't imagine there would be a penalty for such a behavior (I'd certainly take that one to court based on the wording of the regulation). In Wisconsin, it's no different fishing for Lake Sturgeon on Lake Winnebago. You can only fish them in Winter with a permit, but if you happen to snag one in the Summer and practice catch and release... you are fine.

Either way to me a fresh Lake Trout meal is just too tasty to pass up so I've always bought the trout stamp when heading up the BW as it's only an additional 10 bucks. 

This concisely sums up my understanding of the regulation as well.  Brook & lake trout are favorites to catch while in the BWCAW, so we always get the stamp.  Point being - it should never be an issue for us.

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